PlusNET - The Smarter Way to Internet!
 :: Home      :: Rallying      :: Subaru Impreza      :: Colin McRae MBE      :: Projects      :: Entertainment      :: Photo Gallery      :: Contact      :: Directory    
 ScoUK.net > subaru-impreza > Special Edtions - RB320 P2 UK300 P1 WR1 RB5 22B
Tuesday, 30 May, 2017 - 08:25 (UK)  

..:: The Subaru Impreza Story

1. The Subaru Impreza Story, as told by me
2. The History of the Subaru Impreza
3. Special Editions
4. Image Galleries
5. My 2001 Subaru Impreza WRX - Red Mica


..:: Special Editions - RB320, P2, WR1, UK300, P1, RB5, 22B & more

Here we have the complete list of Special Edition Subaru Impreza's were/are available in the UK. There have been many more editions released world wide, but here is the list of UK models along with there specifications.

       

 RB320 - 2007

November 2006, exactly one year after the sad death of Richard Burns from a brain tumour. Subaru UK announced a new special edition of their MY06 Subaru Impreza WRX STi. The RB320 is packaged in Obsidian black, with bespoke black alloys. May not be to everyone's liking but I think it looks fantastic and appropriate for the anniversary. The RB320 is no limited edition paint job, as the name suggests the RB320 delivers around 320bhp from it's WRX STi PPP package. That's a lot of oomph!! Added to that just about every subaru/prodrive option you can think of has been added as standard on the RB320

 Model
RB320
Overall Length mm
4465
Overall Width mm
1740
Overall Height mm
1440
Wheelbase mm
2540
Kerb Weight kg
1495
 
Engine Size cc
2457
Max Output bhp @ RPM
320@6000
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
332@3700
0-60 sec
4.8
0-100 sec
12.2
Top Speed mph
155(estimated)
 
Number of models
320
Cost
£29,995

Back to top

 P2 - 2005 (Prototype, not in production)

Prototype vehicle made by prodrive. Initial runours hoped it woudl be the next Impreza, but it was purely a prototype, never to be put into production. Pity it was pretty sticky in the bends!

Back to top

 WR1 - 2004

In 2004, the Subaru World Rally Team finally got back to winning Rally Championships thanks to Petter Solberg and traditionally released a Special Edition Subaru Impreza to celebrate, in the form of the WR1. Based on the latest Subaru Impreza WRX STi the WR1 also had the added Prodrive Performance Pack PPP Which makes this the most powerful and fastest Subaru Impreza you can buy off the shelf!

 Model
WR1
Subaru Impreza WR1
Overall Length mm
4415
Overall Width mm
1740
Overall Height mm
1415
Wheelbase mm
2525
Kerb Weight kg
1470
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
315@5800
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
309@4000
0-60 sec
4.25
0-100 sec
10.67
Top Speed mph
155
 
Number of models
500
Cost
£29,995

Back to top

 UK300 - 2001

After a gap of no special editions. Subaru came back in 2001 with a new shaped Subaru Impreza, a new World Rally Title, with the help of Richard Burns , and a therefore a new Special edition in the form of then UK300.

 Model
UK300
Overall Length mm
4405
Overall Width mm
1730
Overall Height mm
1440
Wheelbase mm
2525
Kerb Weight kg
1385
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
215@5600
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
215@3600
0-60 sec
5.9
0-100 sec
unknown
Top Speed mph
143
 
Number of models
300
Cost
unknown

Back to top

 P1 - 1999

The second special edition to be released in 1999 was the P1, which was more to do with Prodrive than Subaru directly. Prodrive is the company that develops the Impreza's for the World Rally Teams, so they know a thing or two about the Subaru Impreza. Therefore, they decided to release their own special edition Impreza. P1.

 Model
P1
Subaru Impreza P1
Overall Length mm
4350
Overall Width mm
1690
Overall Height mm
1400
Wheelbase mm
2520
Kerb Weight kg
1295
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
276@6500
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
253@4000
0-60 sec
4.66
0-100 sec
12.3
Top Speed mph
155
 
Number of models
1,000
Cost
unknown

Back to top

 RB5 - 1999

In 1999 Subaru released two new special edition Subaru Impreza's. The first of those was the RB5. This was to celebrate the new driver lineup with Richard Burns.

 Model
RB5
Subaru Impreza RB5
Overall Length mm
4350
Overall Width mm
1690
Overall Height mm
1400
Wheelbase mm
2520
Kerb Weight kg
1235
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
215@5600
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
214@4000
0-60 sec
4.7
0-100 sec
13.0
Top Speed mph
149
 
Number of models
444
Cost
unknown

Back to top

 22B - 1998

Often considered the best Subaru Impreza ever. The Impreza 22B was released in 1998 and came with a new 2.2litre engine. Although overall power was the same torque was improved to to the larger capacity. The 22B was also dresses in 2-door coupe form unlike previous 4-door Impreza's

 Model
22B
Subaru Impreza 22B
Overall Length mm
4365
Overall Width mm
1770
Overall Height mm
1170
Wheelbase mm
2520
Kerb Weight kg
1302
 
Engine Size cc
2212
Max Output bhp @ RPM
276@6000
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
268@3200
0-60 sec
4.7
0-100 sec
13.0
Top Speed mph
149
 
Number of models
400
Cost
unknown

Back to top

 Terzo - 1997

The Subaru Impreza Terzo was released in 1997 in order to celebrate a hat-trick of championship wins for the Subaru 555 World Rally Team.

 Model
Terzo

Overall Length mm
unknown
Overall Width mm
unknown
Overall Height mm
unknown
Wheelbase mm
unknown
Kerb Weight kg
unknown
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
208@5600
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
214@4000
0-60 sec
unknown
0-100 sec
unknown
Top Speed mph
unknown
 
Number of models
333
Cost
unknown

Back to top

 Catalunya - 1996

Celebrating Subaru's second World Rally Championship title in 1996, The Catalunya Subaru Impreza.

 Model
Catalunya
Overall Length mm
unknown
Overall Width mm
unknown
Overall Height mm
unknown
Wheelbase mm
unknown
Kerb Weight kg
unknown
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
208@5600
Max Torque Nm @ RPM
214@4000
0-60
unknown
0-100
unknown
Top Speed
unknown
 
Number of models
unknown
Cost
unknown

Back to top

 Series McRae - 1995

The Series McRae Subaru Impreza was released in late 1995 to celebrate the achievement of the Subaru 555 World Rally team and Colin McRae winning the World Rally Championship for the first time for both driver and manufacturer.

 Model
Series McRae
Overall Length mm
3230
Overall Width mm
1690
Overall Height mm
1440
Wheelbase mm
2520
Kerb Weight kg
unknown
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
unknown
Max Torque Nm @ RPM
unknown
0-60
unknown
0-100
unknown
Top Speed
unknown
 
Number of models
200
Cost
unknown

Back to top

<< PREV
Google



 

..:: Featured Motoring News feed

 Autocar RSS Feed

Rapid Intervention Vehicle unveiled as military jeep
Rapid Intervention Vehicle unveiled as military jeep

A RIV can be flown into battle via Chinook helicopter
Developed by British firm Horiba-MIRA, the RIV can sprint from 0-62mph in 10.5sec with a top speed of 100mph

A military jeep that can do 100mph on desert sand and out-accelerate many family cars has been built by a UK test facility that provides development and consultancy services to vehicle manufacturers.

Called the RIV, which stands for Rapid Intervention Vehicle, it is the work of Horiba-MIRA. Without being based on any pre-existing vehicle, it took the Warwickshire-based company just 12 months to design and build it from scratch.

The RIV was commissioned by NIMR, a military vehicle manufacturer based in the United Arab Emirates, to a challenging brief: to design and build a high-performance vehicle for use in the desert by UAE special forces, for rapid insertion into dangerous areas via Chinook helicopter.

The RIV can carry four heavily armed soldiers each weighing around 120kg. Much of the body and structure is fabricated steel, but the wings and bonnet are composite. It has a spaceframe chassis, short entry and departure angles for 36-degree dune gradients and a flat floor to minimise the risk of becoming grounded on dunes. The independent, variable-height, long-travel suspension has a maximum 300mm ground clearance, but can be lowered to 120mm to make it easier to load the vehicle onto a Chinook. The suspension features Horstman hydrostruts. They?re filled with fluid and nitrogen which become firmer as they get hotter, in the process alerting the driver to potential overheating issues. To tune its wheels for different surface conditions the RIV has an onboard tyre inflation system.

Power is provided by an uprated version of the 3.0-litre V6 diesel found in the Maserati Ghibli. It produces 296bhp and 443lb ft, and drives the RIV?s four wheels via a ZF eightspeed automatic gearbox, Torsen T2R torque-sensing differentials and a transfer ?box with a lockable diff. All can withstand desert temperatures of up to 55deg C.

Despite weighing 4000kg the RIV can do 0-62mph in 10.5sec on the way to a maximum speed of 100mph, with or without windscreen. As it accelerates, the RIV?s aerodynamically styled body guides sand over the top of the vehicle to avoid clogging the interior. Winglets at the front reduce drag around the wheels. At 62mph, it will cover about 600 miles on a tank of fuel.

?It?s the fastest vehicle across the desert,? said Jim Hopton, the project?s chief engineer. ?Its secret is getting into and out of combat quickly, reliably and safely, going where few other vehicles can, so avoiding the Improvised Exposive Devices that cripple those using traditional routes.?

Horiba-Mira has built three development vehicles, two of which are currently undergoing evaluation by the UAE military.

?A lesser vehicle lasts about six months in the hands of the military before it?s wrecked,? said Hopton. ?Not one frame has broken during testing and we believe an RIV could last at least three years.? 

Price £200,000 (est) Body Steel spaceframe with composite panels Engine Fiat-Chrysler 3.0 V6 diesel Power, torque 296bhp, 443lb ft Transmission ZF 8-spd auto, four-wheel drive, Torsen differentials Suspension Independent, variable ride height Weight 4000kg Dimensions Length: 5250mm; width: 1820mm; height: 1850mm Performance 0-62mph 10.5sec; top speed 100mph; range 600 miles

DRIVING THE RAPID INTERVENTION VEHICLE

To climb aboard the RIV you grab the rollcage, place a foot on the sidestep and swing up and into the deep bucket seat, before clipping yourself into the racing harness.

The functional design extends to the cockpit which, despite a wealth of dials and buttons and a large centre screen, wouldn?t impress EuroNCAP due to its unyielding bare metal construction. Still, at least the steering wheel adjusts for rake.

The dashboard is home to fuel, speed, revcounter and engine temperature gauges. At the top of the centre console is a multi-function screen showing the status of the RIV?s power distribution management system. Below that are the controls for the tyre inflation system and the RIV?s ride height. To their left is the stubby ZF shift lever.

Turn the ignition key and press the Power button and the V6 engine settles to a diesely rumble, but it?s the steady hiss of compressed air produced by the turbocharger and escaping from the straight-through exhaust that is most noticeable at tickover.

Engage Drive (the lever moves smoothly and precisely) and pull away, and the ZF gearbox changes gear quickly and seamlessly as the revs build. This blend of ultrasophisticated mechanicals and battle-ready hardware is the most impressive thing about the RIV.

The jeep gathers speed remarkably quickly but without drama. At around 40mph, its ride on MIRA?s sinewy handling track is firm but not bouncy, ensuring the RIV is stable and secure in corners. However, while the Mercedes-sourced steering system is light, it lacks feel. A hefty shove on the brakes brings the 4000kg RIV up short without fuss.

Autocar wasn?t permitted to drive the RIV on MIRA?s outer test circuit, but with the company?s test driver at the wheel it certainly achieved its claimed 0-62mph sprint time of 10.5 seconds, on the way to an indicated and unflappable 100mph. 

John Evans

BMW M4 CS 2017 review
BMW M4 CS 2017

The BMW M4 CS feels more like a familiar M4 perfected than one reinvented, but it?s better than an M4 Competition and more usable than a GTS
Mould-making M-car special feels more like a familiar M4 perfected than one reinvented, but it?s better than an M4 Competition and more usable than a GTS The BMW M4 CS is the BMW Motorsport Division?s definitive take on the performance 4-series Coupe. Maybe. And if so, only at the fifth time of asking if we include the late ?DTM Champion Edition? in the list of M4s we?ve been treated to already. Well, it?s no more cynical than Porsche?s profiteering with the ?991?-generation 911 GT3, is it? Where desirable performance derivatives are concerned, it seems anything goes.The M4 CS comes to market about a year after the even more expensive and specialized M4 GTS. It will be in production for the thick end of two years and officially it?s not a limited-series car: BMW M says it will simply make as many as it can within the time it has to make them. About 1000 a year, he says. And M boss Frank van Meel also says there?s sufficient global demand for the car to sell every one they?ll make.Perhaps most interesting of all, the M4 CS is the start of something new and interesting from the M Division. Cars in this mould, with ?CS? badging, will be a constant feature of BMW M?s model range from this point onwards ? or so say company insiders. In light of that fact, Munich certainly wouldn?t want to undershoot against expectations with the first one.No danger of that last time around, you may remember. The M4 GTS was an incredible car, but one that stretched the margins of acceptability for a BMW M-car in all sorts of ways: most notably on usability and value. It cost £120,000, it had a relatively high-maintenance water-injected engine, it had manually adjustable coilover suspension, it had no back seats and ? much too firmly suspended for mixed road driving in the state in which it was supplied for the test ? it finished towards the bottom of our final order in last year?s Britain?s Best Driver?s Car shootout. BMW said it would built 700 of them and, a year on from the car?s appearance in UK showrooms, the word is that you can still get a brand new one without looking too hard or waiting too long. Not exactly a smash hit, then.So if Porsche 911 GT3 RS-level mechanical execution and outlay turned out to be a bit rich for an M4, what happens when BMW M takes some of the GTS? more trick ingredients, halves that car?s price premium and keeps everyday road suitability front of mind during the dynamic tuning process? The new M4 CS is the answer: a car with plenty of the special track-ready flavour of the GTS, but whose engine and suspension don?t require a ready supply of distilled water and a garage with a hydraulic lift to get the best out of.

Autocar confidential: BMW, Honda, Audi, Mazda
Honda Civic

2017 Honda Civic
Our reporters empty their notebooks to round up this week's gossip from across the automotive industry

This week's gossip from the automotive industry has news of BMW's car-sharing service, Honda's next-gen Civic, Audi Sport and how Mazda's cars come to life.

Share your BMW

BMW has launched a flexible car-sharing service called ReachNow, which includes the ability for owners of apartment buildings to offer cars that residents can use on short-term hire. BMW and Mini owners in Seattle, where the scheme was launched, can also lend out their car when they don?t need to use it.

Read more: BMW 8 Series to return in 2018BMW M5 prototype review: super saloon goes four-wheel drive

Honda's next-gen Civic

Honda is already in the planning stages for the next-generation Civic, which will make its debut in 2021. The next Civic will play a key role in Honda?s plan for two-thirds of all its cars sold in Europe to feature some form of electrification. Honda?s Swindon plant director, Jason Smith, said the company is in the very early stages of exploring how a Civic with some form of electrification would be manufactured at the plant.

Read more: 2017 Honda Civic 1.0 i-VTEC Turbo SRHonda Civic Si coupé and saloon revealed for American market

Audi Sport division

Audi's quattro division was renamed Audi Sport after the original name became too complex to explain in new markets, CEO Rupert Stadler has said. ?Quattro was heavily linked to four-wheel drive, and then we would go to new markets like Asia and explain we were a division of Audi called Quattro GmbH. People just got lost. Having our road and competition activities under one banner with a simple name communicates what we do.?

Read more: New Audi RS5 Coupé to cost from £62,900Audi Sport announces Dieter Gass as new motorsport boss

How Mazdas come to life

When Mazda designs a car, it starts by designing an object first. It boils down the design it wants to achieve to an abstract object, showing the design in its purest form before then applying it to the style of car it wants to create. Mazda then designs other products to the same theme, such as chairs and bicycles.

Read more: Updated Mazda CX-3 range gains new GT Sport modelMazda 3 MPS | Used Car Buying Guide

Analysing the UK Government's plan to tackle NOx emissions
How the Government plans to tackle NOx emissions

Although NOx emissions have decreased with each Euro emissions standard, the discrepancy between official limits and the values achieved via ?real world? testing has increased.
The government wants to reduce air pollution with these plans ? but do they go far enough?

On Friday 5 May, just two days after parliament was dissolved in preparation for the general election, a long-awaited government air quality consultation paper was made public.

But with the current parliament now history, why release a policy that is, arguably, no longer valid because the government that drew it up no longer exists?

The move had been ordered by the High Court in London after an activist law firm, Client Earth, had taken the government to court for the second time in six months. Client Earth demanded that plans to meet EU air pollution regulations be published immediately, because the issue was a ?public health emergency?. The judge agreed.

Scrappage scheme and speed limit changes top government air quality plans

A few months earlier, Client Earth had gone to court demanding a judgement against the government?s relatively slow pace of meeting the EU air quality regulations. The government?s plans aim to meet the regulations by 2020 in affected UK towns and cities, and by 2025 in London.

Client Earth succeeded in arguing that the government should have been deploying more aggressive tactics to reduce NOx pollution, including more Clean Air Zones in town centres and an extensive diesel scrappage scheme to encourage drivers of older and more polluting oilburners to trade them for a cleaner car.

The new consultation paper, drawn up by the Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) and the Department of Transport (DoT), does include a wider range of proposed schemes to reduce NOx pollution but, to the evident fury of Client Earth, Greenpeace and the current Mayor of London, none are as far-reaching as was wanted.

The consultation paper notes that blame for problem of NOx pollution lies with the dash to reduce CO2 emissions by incentivising diesel cars: ?The number of diesel cars in Great Britain grew from 3.2 million in 2000 to 8.2m in 2010. This growth followed tax changes made by previous governments, which focused on fuel economy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions.

?None of this is the fault of those who chose to buy diesels and, as we tackle the problem, these same people should not be penalised for decisions they made in good faith.?

The paper also reproduces a graphic showing just how much more NOx diesel vehicles have been legally allowed to emit compared to petrol engines. The message is clear: the EU?s decision to emphasise reducing fuel consumption without regard to diesel?s greater pollution was a major error.

Indeed, it wasn?t until Euro 6 standards were introduced for cars in 2014 that NOx emissions from diesels had to get closer to the standards for petrol engines. The live issue is that real-world NOx emissions from EU6 vehicles can be as much as eight times higher than those emitted during laboratory tests (see diagram, below right). For that, car makers are surely responsible.

The paper says that the NOx problem is concentrated on certain roads and streets and that this means the chief sources of roadside NOx must be targeted. It says around 60% of pavement-side NOx is attributable to road vehicles.

And while diesel cars are grouped together as the largest single NOx offender, light and heavy goods vehicles and buses combined are the source for more than half of roadside NOx pollution (see graphic, below).

In order to bring NOx levels in affected areas down to legal levels, the consultation?s main policy will be to give local authorities the ?clear legal duty? to establish Clean Air Zones (CAZs) if necessary.

However, considering the administration costs of the London Congestion Charge, it does seems unlikely that hitting drivers with a fee to enter a CAZ could be viably implemented outside of the capital. The government warns that such a congestion charge should only target ?older, high-pollution? vehicles.

A Toxicity Charge will be launched in central London in October. It will add £10 to the cost of the existing £11.50 Congestion Charge for pre-EU4 diesel vehicles.

The paper rejected the idea of a mass diesel scrappage scheme. It said that replacing all pre-EU6 diesel vehicles would cost £60bn. Any scheme would also have to be administered regionally, which could be a hurdle for cashstrapped local authorities.

The rest of the plans in the report are modest. There will be money for retro-fitting buses with anti-pollution kit and converting taxis to run on gas. ?Road layouts and junctions? should be designed to optimise traffic flow and consideration should be given to removing speed bumps to reduce the amount of unnecessary acceleration.

Hype about reducing the speed limit on motorways to 60mph is just that: the paper says only 1% of the UK?s strategic road network exceeds the N0x limits, so dropping the speed limit would hardly be noticed because the N0x breaches are almost certainly caused by congestion.

It?s clear the government did not want to punish drivers for buying diesel vehicles that EU legislation incentivised. But there?s also no doubt that activists such as Client Earth will be back in court after the General Election. They want big policy actions on the issue of NOx. The government?s plans to little more than legally devolve the oversight of NOx reduction to local authorities could well frustrate that aim.

Read more:

Is it time to say goodbye to diesel?

Diesel engines: your questions answered

Diesel engines: what comes out of your car's tailpipe?

London and Paris announce real-world emissions testing for cars

Past Masters: used Honda Accord Type R review
Past Masters: Honda Accord Type R review This future classic could be yours for just £1200, but what's it really like on the road?

Were you not acquainted with the Honda Accord Type R, you?d be forgiven for thinking it was going to be a bit? well? rubbish.

Let?s face it: this generation of Accord was better known for providing solid but soul-sappingly dull transport for those of a certain generation. The idea of one with a spoiler the size of a small humpback bridge would seem rather tragic, if you weren?t in the know.

Of course, you are in the know. And if you aren?t, you should probably have read the buyers? guide on the left, rather than skipping straight to this bit. Go on, off you go. We?ll wait here for you.

Finished? Good. So now you?ll be aware of the fantastic underpinnings that make the Type R so special. And that?s before we even get started on its impressive heritage, building on a successful BTCC tie-in as well as the years of Type R lore before that.

With all this in mind, you?d be forgiven for feeling a little let down upon climbing aboard your first Accord Type R. The dashboard is robust and well built, as you?d expect from Honda, but the plastics are dour and the italicised font on the dials looks cheap and rather dated.

Fortunately, the Recaro seats are brilliant. Beautiful, figure-hugging and clad in Alcantara, they?re every bit the sort of seats you?d want to see in a touring car for the road. Together with the metal gearknob and a few slivers of carbonfibre, they lift the interior just enough to endow it with a sense of occasion.

In typical Honda style, the Accord?s engine purrs into life quickly and settles to a mill-smooth idle. And at everyday speeds, it?s docile and easy to drive. But unlike many Type Rs, it isn?t completely devoid of low-down punch ? thanks largely to the H22A7 lump?s 2.2-litre capacity. Although it hasn?t quite got the brawn of, say, a V6-powered Ford Mondeo ST200, neither does it feel completely flaccid.

Of course, all that changes once you hit 5000rpm or so, at which point the VTEC starts doing its thing. Unlike more modern VTEC systems, the kick with the Accord Type R is visceral; a noticeable switch, at which point the engine tone?s edge hardens and your head jerks slightly as the car surges forward.

From then on, it?s pure excitement, right to the rev limiter. The soundtrack has hints of racing car about it, and unending shove has you changing gear quickly to search for more. The problem is, the long gearbox drops you just below the VTEC engagement point on an upshift ? although that does have the side effect of giving you a moment?s anticipation as the revs build into that sweet spot once again.

At this point, a corner will be rapidly approaching, so it?s time to come to another frequent Type R trope: steering feel, or a lack of it. Again, that isn?t a problem here, as the Accord features hydraulic, rather than electronic, power steering. Together with the standard limited-slip diff, the result is plenty of feel as the front wheels snatch and grab at the road surface, finding whatever grip is there to tug you around the bend, but never so violently as to kick the wheel back in your hands. It immediately becomes clear that this is a beautifully set up frontwheel-drive car, and one with an absolute corker of an engine, too.

That it?s also a car that can carry the whole family and be bought for a pittance only swells the Accord?s appeal. It might not have the cult appeal of an Integra or a Civic but, at the moment, it?s cheaper than either, almost as sweet to drive as the former, and even more involving than the latter. Buy one now, before everyone else cottons on. 

Interested in purchasing one? Here's our guide on the do's and dont's when doing so

       

Reccomended sites:

---------------------------

  Back to top

  Copyright 1999 - 2017 Alan Addison, ScoUK.net - All Rights Reserved

tso - page constructed in 0.101 seconds